OBOC 2018-19


Shared Experiences Draw People Together.
Share a Book.
Share an Experience.

Shared experiences draw people together. That is why we are continuing the One Book, One Community (OBOC) program for its 10th year. Everyone in the school is invited to join together in reading and discussing Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.

Selecting this Year’s Book: From the Dean

"Evicted by Matthew Desmond describes the plight of poor families who, for want of a few dollars, are forced to move from their homes, apartments, or trailers. An ethnographer, Desmond shares the intimate vicissitudes of his subject / friends as they struggle to make ends meet while negotiating a bewildering system of slumlords, public agencies, law enforcement, and courts, a system that seems almost designed to reinforce a downward spiral of poverty. The consequences of eviction are especially felt by mothers with young children, whose development is jeopardized by substandard housing, low quality neighborhoods, and poor nutrition. 

"Social factors are well known to be paramount determinants of health and well-being, and Evicted heartbreakingly illuminates how poverty and lack of housing affect families and communities. America’s health compares poorly to other economically developed counties. Everyone interested in improving public health should read Evicted to better understand poverty, housing, and health.”

The book has been a New York Times best seller, won a Pulitzer Prize, and was on Bill Gates’s summer reading list in 2017

OBOC 2019 Main Event: "Close to Home: Street Medicine" with founder James Withers on 3/28

 One Book One Community, the Global Health Student Association, and the Center for Global Health present the powerful 30-minute documentary Close to Home: Street Medicine which shares voices of service providers and oft-forgotten homeless patients in our region. Catch the film and hear directly from:

  • Jim Withers, founder and medical director of Pittsburgh Mercy’s Operation Safety Net® and the Street Medicine Institute.
  • Matt Lewis, producer and videographer of Close to Home, co-produced by PBS 39 and the Lehigh Valley Health Network.

Check out the @PittPubicHealth on Instagram to enter & win a free copy of Evicted.

 

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Read-Along Program

Alumni, families, and friends are invited to sign up below and read along with the school’s students and faculty by participating in the second read-along program. Read Evicted and participate in live and virtual events and discussions. Read more...

WHERE TO GET THE BOOK

Get 10 percent off at the University Store on Fifth (with Pitt ID).

Also available at Pitt's Hillman LibraryFalk Library (HSLS), and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Questions?

With questions about OBOC, or to suggest an event, contact Kimmy Rehak, educational programs specialist.

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In The News

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How Police Violence Could Impact the Health of Black Infants 

How Police Violence Could Impact the Health of Black Infants

NPR - George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis placed police violence again in the national limelight with protests erupting. But Black and brown communities say the effect of police violence is felt long after demonstrations die down. In fact, research shows trauma from racism and violence can leave ... (11/17/2020)
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The U.S. medical system is still haunted by slavery (video) 

The U.S. medical system is still haunted by slavery (video)

VOX - Black women's history matters in medicine. The U.S. is the most dangerous industrialized country in which to give birth, and racial disparities in maternal mortality make it even worse for women of color. And they're seeking your help in understanding the problem.   (11/17/2020)
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Why are so many Black women still dying in childbirth?  

Why are so many Black women still dying in childbirth?

INDEPENDENT - In the U.K., Black women are five times more likey to die in pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period, compared to their white counterparts. In the U.S. there are similar racial disparities in its maternal deaths with black and indigenous Americans being two to three times a... (11/12/2020)
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How the CDC and others are failing Black women during childbirth 

How the CDC and others are failing Black women during childbirth

STAT - The alarming number of deaths of Black women during childbirth and soon afterward once gained little national attention. That changed, partly because of the high-profile deaths of Dr. Sharon Irving and Kira Johnson, and the delayed response to Serena Williams' request for treatment of a post... (11/12/2020)
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Why are Black women at such high risk of dying from pregnancy complications? 

Why are Black women at such high risk of dying from pregnancy complications?

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS - Black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's partly why the overall rate of pregnancy-related deaths has climbed over the past two decades, m... (11/12/2020)
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America is Failing its Black Mothers 

America is Failing its Black Mothers

HARVARD MAGAZINE - Following decades of decline, maternal deaths began to rise in the United States around 1990—a significant departure from the world’s other affluent countries. By 2013, rates had more than doubled. The CDC now estimates that 700 to 900 new and expectant mothers die in the U.S. ea... (11/12/2020)
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Mona says there’s a good reason Flint is still on filtered and bottled water (audio) 

Mona says there’s a good reason Flint is still on filtered and bottled water (audio)

WKAR - “It's because our pipes are being replaced and we are almost done with that. But by the end of 2019 all of the lead pipes in Flint will have been replaced, which is pretty incredible. We'll only be the third city in the country that has replaced their lead pipes. Lansing, Michigan is one of ... (09/16/2019)
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OBOC author: I helped expose the lead crisis in Flint. Here's what other cities should do. 

OBOC author: I helped expose the lead crisis in Flint. Here's what other cities should do.

THE NEW YORK TIMES - Mona Hanna-Attisha, author of What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City, explains how persistence, activism, teamwork, and science prevailed when the powers-that-be tried to silence her research when she found lead in the blood of Flin... (08/28/2019)