One Book, One Community

19oboc

Shared Experiences Draw People Together.
Share a Book.
Share an Experience.

We are stronger together. Shared experiences draw people together. That is why we are continuing the One Book, One Community (OBOC) program for its 12th year. Everyone in the school is invited to join together in reading and discussing a shared book.

You can also check out the first 11 years of OBOC programming!

The 2020-21 OBOC book:

Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth 
by Dána-Ain Davis

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"A troubling study of the role that medical racism plays in the lives of black women who have given birth to premature and low birth weight infants. Black women have higher rates of premature birth than other women in America. This cannot be simply explained by economic factors, with poorer women lacking resources or access to care. Even professional, middle-class black women are at a much higher risk of premature birth than low-income white women in the United States. Dána-Ain Davis looks into this phenomenon, placing racial differences in birth outcomes into a historical context, revealing that ideas about reproduction and race today have been influenced by the legacy of ideas which developed during the era of slavery.

While poor and low-income black women are often the “mascots” of premature birth outcomes, this book focuses on professional black women, who are just as likely to give birth prematurely. Drawing on an impressive array of interviews with nearly fifty mothers, fathers, neonatologists, nurses, midwives, and reproductive justice advocates, Dána-Ain Davis argues that events leading up to an infant’s arrival in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and the parents’ experiences while they are in the NICU, reveal subtle but pernicious forms of racism that confound the perceived class dynamics that are frequently understood to be a central factor of premature birth."

(text condensed from  NYU Press)

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Questions?

With questions about OBOC, or to suggest an event, contact Kimmy Rehak, educational programs specialist.

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In The News

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How Police Violence Could Impact the Health of Black Infants 

How Police Violence Could Impact the Health of Black Infants

NPR - George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis placed police violence again in the national limelight with protests erupting. But Black and brown communities say the effect of police violence is felt long after demonstrations die down. In fact, research shows trauma from racism and violence can leave ... (11/17/2020)
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The U.S. medical system is still haunted by slavery (video) 

The U.S. medical system is still haunted by slavery (video)

VOX - Black women's history matters in medicine. The U.S. is the most dangerous industrialized country in which to give birth, and racial disparities in maternal mortality make it even worse for women of color. And they're seeking your help in understanding the problem.   (11/17/2020)
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Why are so many Black women still dying in childbirth?  

Why are so many Black women still dying in childbirth?

INDEPENDENT - In the U.K., Black women are five times more likey to die in pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period, compared to their white counterparts. In the U.S. there are similar racial disparities in its maternal deaths with black and indigenous Americans being two to three times a... (11/12/2020)
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How the CDC and others are failing Black women during childbirth 

How the CDC and others are failing Black women during childbirth

STAT - The alarming number of deaths of Black women during childbirth and soon afterward once gained little national attention. That changed, partly because of the high-profile deaths of Dr. Sharon Irving and Kira Johnson, and the delayed response to Serena Williams' request for treatment of a post... (11/12/2020)
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Why are Black women at such high risk of dying from pregnancy complications? 

Why are Black women at such high risk of dying from pregnancy complications?

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS - Black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's partly why the overall rate of pregnancy-related deaths has climbed over the past two decades, m... (11/12/2020)
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