Welcome to Fall 2021, new Department of Epidemiology Students!

Pictured above: our new fall 2021 PhD, MPH, and MS students, along with spring and summer 2021 matriculated students.

 

The Department of Epidemiology of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health is leading research and prevention activities that impact public health by training students to evaluate and respond to important public health issues in aging and chronic disease prevention, reproductive health, environmental health, and infectious diseases.

 

The program provides a strong foundation in epidemiology, which is a core discipline in public health. Our epidemiology graduate programs incorporate into the teaching program activities that provide a practical and clinically relevant educational experience that is based on a foundation of research excellence.. Students take a series of core courses in epidemiology and public health, and may choose to focus on one of several Areas of Emphasis. Faculty in each of these areas direct major research programs and training grants that provide excellent opportunities for student research and field training.

Find a research program for your interests

Pitt Public Health faculty members conduct small and large observational studies and clinical trials of problems that have major impact on the health of populations, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, premature birth, and injury. Faculty members may also lead field centers or coordinating centers for multicenter national and international observational studies and clinical trials.

Major areas of emphasis include...

  • Aging
  • Applied public health
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular and diabetes
  • Clinical trials and methods
  • Environmental
  • Global health
  • Infectious disease
  • Injury prevention
  • Molecular and genetic
  • Obesity and nutritional
  • Population neuroscience
  • Prevention, lifestyle and physical activity
  • Psychiatric
  • Reproductive, perinatal and pediatric
  • Social epidemiology and health equity
  • Women’s health

 

Harrison co-authors Conversation piece - Massive numbers of new COVID-19 infections, not vaccines, are the main driver of new coronavirus variants

THE CONVERSATION – The rise o...
Harrison co-authors Conversation piece - Massive numbers of new COVID-19 infections, not vaccines, are the main driver of new coronavirus variants

THE CONVERSATION – The rise of coronavirus variants globally has highlighted the huge influence evolutionary biology has on daily life. But how mutations, random chance, and natural selection produce variants is a complicated process. What EPI and IDM’s Lee Harrison and a Pitt Medicine colleague ha... (09/13/2021)

Harrison on possible J&J Booster

KDKA-TV  - "I would not expec...
Harrison on possible J&J Booster

KDKA-TV  - "I would not expect anything worrisome with a booster dose but we need to see what the data shows," said Pitt Medicine and EPI's Lee Harrison.  (08/30/2021)

U.S. Energy Firms Launching Employee COVID-19 Vaccination Mandates

REUTERS - Energy and construc...
U.S. Energy Firms Launching Employee COVID-19 Vaccination Mandates

REUTERS - Energy and construction workers have some of the lowest vaccine uptake rates, according to an online survey led by EPI's Wendy King. Some 45% of extraction and construction workers said they were hesitant to get the vaccine, versus just 7.3% in the computer and mathematical professions, t... (08/30/2021)

Other Voices: A rush to judgment on Alzheimer's drug?

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE - An ...
Other Voices: A rush to judgment on Alzheimer's drug?

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE - An op-ed from Mary Ganguli (EPI '87): Imagine that your doctor has just told that you most likely have Alzheimer’s disease, an incurable type of dementia. And then you see on the news that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new drug for Alzheimer’s ... (08/30/2021)

A group of moms on Facebook built an island of good-faith vaccine debate in a sea of misinformation

THE WASHINGTON POST - People ...
A group of moms on Facebook built an island of good-faith vaccine debate in a sea of misinformation

THE WASHINGTON POST - People concerned about vaccine safety may be easier to convince than those who don't trust the government or medical authorities, said EPI's Wendy King (EPI '04). Earlier this year, King surveyed more than 5 million U.S. adults about their attitudes toward coronavirus vaccines... (08/30/2021)