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30 percent of women have this down-there infection—and they don’t even know it

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READERS DIGEST - As many as one in three women will develop bacterial vaginosis (BV) at some point in their lives, but most will have zero clue that have an infection that can wreak havoc on their fertility and increase their risk of developing HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. “Bacterial vaginosis affects nearly 1-in-3 reproductive-aged women, so there is great need to understand how it can be prevented,” said LISA BODNAR, assist... 

Bridging the Gaps Pittsburgh celebrates 20 years of promoting health in underserved communities (video)

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Celebrating 20 years of service, BRIDGING THE GAPS PITTSBURGH has focused on promoting health in underserved communities while training future health and social service professionals. More than 350 community health interns have collaborated with 58 community partners to provide over 10,255 days of service in the greater Pittsburgh area.  

History and fitness buffs inaugurate Clymer’s WalkWorks Program

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INDIANA GAZETTE -- A joint project of the PA Department of Health and Pitt Public Health, WalkWorks' mission is to increase physical activity through community walks. Spearheaded locally by Indiana County Office of Planning and Development, volunteers with interests in physical fitness and community history serve as walk leaders and narrators along the new 2.25-mile WalkWorks path in Clymer. Other WalkWorks paths in Blairsville, Ernest, Glen C... 

Tseng and Ma use Bayesian hierarchical models to detect and categorize biomarkers in RNA sequencing

RNA-SEQ BLOG - Important work by biostatistics and human genetics professor GEORGE TSENG and biostatistics PhD student TIANZHOU MA proposes a full Bayesian hierarchical model for RNA-seq meta-analysis by modelling count data, integrating information across genes and across studies, and modelling potentially heterogeneous differential signals across studies via latent variables. 

Former Cincinnati health commissioner joins Pitt school of public health

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TRIBUNE-REVIEW - NOBLE A-W MASERU has been named director of the Center for Health Equity and associate dean for diversity at Pitt Public Health. “Dr. Maseru devoted his energies to achieving a healthier Cincinnati ...particularly in vulnerable and underserved populations,” said Donald S. Burke, dean. “We are delighted to have him join our faculty and bring his expertise to Pittsburgh.” 

Why belly fat really is the worst kind of weight gain, especially for women

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NBC TODAY - “Studies have shown that it’s not just being overweight that matters, it’s also where you store the fat,” said co-author SAMAR R. EL KHOUDARY, associate professor of epidemiology. “When the fat is near the heart it can be like a metabolically active organ that can secrete toxic chemicals. And because there is no border between the fat and the heart, it’s much easier for those toxic chemicals to pass into the heart." How much fat accum... 

Gary-Webb elected to chair APHA epidemiology section

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TIFFANY GARY-WEBB, associate professor in BCHS and epidemiology, has been chosen by her peers as chair-elect for the APHA's epidemiology section. Beginning in November, this 6-year commitment consists of 2 years as chair-elect, 2 years as chair, and 2 years as immediate past-chair. Says Gary-Webb, "I see this as an opportunity for GSPH faculty and students who are interested in applied epidemiology to get more connected with the association." 

El Khoudary finds heart disease risk varies by body type and race in women

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TRIB LIVE - A woman's body shape is uniquely connected to her heart disease risk, particularly in midlife, and different shapes are associated with risks in black women than in white women, according to a new analysis by epidemiologist SAMAR EL KHOUDARY. The study's results strengthen a   similar finding   from three years ago among black and white men. “Being able to show the same thing here among women kind of highlights the importance of vis... 

Former MPH classmates meet in Maine for their annual traveling reunion

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One of the many informal summer gatherings of former Pitt Public Health classmates, this group of MPH alumni has reunited every year since graduation in a different place! This year was coastal Maine, primarily Bar Harbor. Pictured are CAROLYN BYRNES (EPI), SARAH LOCH (EPI), NICOLLE NESTLER (BCHS), KELSEY ALLEN (BCHS), KATHLEEN CREPPAGE (EPI), and JESSICA SUCHY (BCHS). Past locations have included Buffalo, DC, Pittsburgh, and Colorado. 

BCHS MPH graduate Michele Buzzelli takes on new collegiate teaching responsibilities in global health

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MICHELE BUZZELLI (BCHS ’15) is putting her MPH to work this fall teaching courses in global health at the Northampton Community College’s Monroe Campus in Tannersville, PA. Buzzelli will also teach a required first-semester course for incoming students entitled College Success which helps students navigate the college environment. 

Geriatric journal's impact rises under Newman's editorship

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The Gerontological Society of America recently announced that new rankings show its academic journals lead among the most-cited aging publications. The Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, which is edited by ANNE NEWMAN, chair of Pitt Public Health's Department of Epidemiology, upheld its first-place ranking on the list of 32 publications, with an impact factor of 5.957. 

Sharpsburg council unanimously passes complete streets resolution

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PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE - The Sharpsburg city council unanimously passed the “complete streets” resolution introduced by Councilwoman Brittany Reno with support from Eric Boerer of BikePGH and CAROL REICHBAUM of Pitt Public Health’s WalkWorks program. “We want people to feel safe when walking.” Providing safe spaces for people to be more active and walk or bike instead of drive encourages them to become more physically active and healthier. 

Contaminants in Pittsburgh's drinking water worry D.C. environmental group, but not local experts

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WESA 90.5 - Lead isn't the only potential water contaminant Pittsburgh residents should worry about, according to researchers at the nonprofit Environmental Working Group. Of potential concern are chemicals called trihalomethanes, though they don't worry Pitt researchers including EOH's AARON BARCHOWSKY, “It’s a weak association that comes from rodent studies but … linking to human cancers has been controversial or weak at best.”  

On health effects, blame the trucks, not the fracking?

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WESA 90.5 - WVU’s Mike McCawley studies the spike in diesel truck traffic as a potential contributor to health impacts associated fracking. EOH’s JIM FABISIAK isn’t surprised, as diesel exhaust is a known carcinogen, adding “We also know that it contributes probably significantly to many of the other health endpoints we attributed to air pollution, such as aggravating asthma and premature deaths from cardiovascular or lung disease.” 

Herbert Needleman, who saw lead’s wider harm to children, dies at 89

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NEW YORK TIMES - Herbert Needleman, whose studies of children exposed to low levels of lead prompted regulations that limited or banned the metal in a range of common products, like gasoline and paint, and set a standard for the modern study of environmental toxins, died on July 18 in Pittsburgh. “[His] was the insight that changed everything,” said BERNARD GOLDSTEIN, former dean of Pitt Public Health. 

Picklesburgh: What's the big dill?

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What a great city! The Picklesburgh festival is a culinary celebration that goes beyond the dill pickle to include international dishes, prepared foods and artisan cocktails; an embrace of the farm-to-table movement and the rising popularity of canning; a selection of handcrafted foods and artisan cocktails from local restaurants; informative how-to demos and author talks at our demo area; and merchandise such as pickled goods, books, and DIY pro... 

Broom joins HPM leadership

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UNIVERSITY TIMES - The Department of Health Policy and Management has named a new vice chair of education and director of the Master of Health Administration (MHA) and MHA/MBA joint degree programs. KEVIN BROOM comes to Pitt from Saint Louis University, where he served as an assistant professor of health management and policy. Broom succeeds WESLEY ROHRER, who returned to the HPM faculty on June 30. 

What impact are our TV binge-watching habits having on our health?

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TV3 EXPOSE  - Ireland's private-TV news broadcaster cites research by Pitt Public Health's BONNY ROCKETTE-WAGNER on the impacts of TV watching on weight gain and diabetes risk. “Television watching (like other sitting behaviours) has very low energy expenditure, and therefore large amounts of time [spent doing it] could lead to energy imbalance and weight gain.” 

EPI's Rosso explores role of exercise in keeping Alzheimer's at bay

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MEDICAL NEWS TODAY - Epidemiologist ANDREA ROSSO set out to uncover why some people respond to physical exercise inventions better than others. Her hunt for these super-responders saw her looking at genes involved in dopamine regulation. Rosso speculates that higher dopamine levels may play a role in sticking to exercise regimes in lifestyle interventions. 

CPHP’s Van Nostrand launches ELI, new award-winning legal tool for emergency volunteers

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In May 2017, ELIZABETH VAN NOSTRAND and her team from the Center for Public Health Practice were honored with the Medical Reserve Corps Program National Partner Recognition Award for the development of ELI, the Emergency Law Inventory tool — a repository of statutes and regulations that impact volunteers participating in emergency response activities on the topics of liability, license reciprocity, scope of practice, and workers’ benefits. 

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Online Service Aiming to Match Moms-to-Be With Doulas Wins Student Pitch Competition 

Online Service Aiming to Match Moms-to-Be With Doulas Wins Student Pitch Competition

PITTWIRE - Finding a suitable doula — a professional who gives physical and educational support before, during and after childbirth — can be difficult, said Pitt Graduate School of Public Health Student ALYSIA TUCKER of BCHS. Her prize-winning idea could make the process easier. (07/07/2017)
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Toward Curing HIV: Test Finds Hidden Virus 

Toward Curing HIV: Test Finds Hidden Virus

PITTWIRE - A team of Pitt scientists led by IDM's PHALGUNI GUPTA developed a test to detect "hidden" HIV that is faster, less labor-intensive and less expensive than the current "gold standard" test. (05/31/2017)
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