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Hacker on how Black girls pay higher price when sex education isn't taught

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PUBLIC SOURCE - Sex education curriculum is approved by district school boards, and the topic can become controversial. Allegheny County Health Department director and HPM/BCHS faculty member  KAREN HACKER says she supports comprehensive sex education. “There’s been very little evidence to show that abstinence-only programs have been successful."  

HUGEN's Feingold studies how genes influence facial appearance

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INSIDEUPMC - Senior associate dean, geneticist, and biostatistician ELEANOR FEINGOLD contributed to this interdisciplinary research team's findings: measures of eye, nose, and facial breadth could be associated with genetic variants in certain regions of the genome. In several of these regions, genes known to contribute to facial development or implicated in birth defects where the face is affected were found. However, because many genes affect f... 

BCHS's Miller helps NYC look to teens to prevent domestic violence

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HUFFINGTON POST -  “When you ask adult survivors of domestic violence when they experienced their first abusive relationship, the majority will tell you it was during adolescence. That really speaks to the importance of prevention work in those middle and high school years,” says  BCHS' ELIZABETH MILLER.  “It’s really complicated for parents to monitor what is going on."  

IDM's Mellors finds latent HIV may exist in both resting and non-resting CD4 T cells

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INFECTIOUS DISEASE ADVISOR - Work of study co-author and IDM professor JOHN MELLORS reported that different clonal virus populations can be recovered from the two cell types. The findings suggest that inducible virus production may be a good marker of the latent infectious reservoir in both cell types. Identifying the sources of latent HIV and developing tools to measure improvements in therapies are essential for clinicians and their patients. 

BCHS' Miller explores why time on social media may make you feel lonely

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BBC - "We do not yet know which came first - the social media use or the perceived social isolation," said co-author and BCHS associate professor ELIZABETH MILLER. "It's possible that young adults who initially felt socially isolated turned to social media. Or it could be that their increased use of social media somehow led to feeling isolated from the real world." 

HPM alumna Inmaculada Hernandez uses genes to determine best anticoagulation

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UNIVERSITY TIMES - A research idea submitted by School of Pharmacy faculty member and Pitt Public Health alumna INMACULADA HERNANDEZ (HPM '16) was one of four selected among 200 submissions for an AHA/PCORI researcher and clinician challenge. Through this challenge, the American Heart Association and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute hopes to generate research ideas that address evidence gaps in the treatment of cardiovascular dise... 

HPM's Mark Roberts presents FRED at international workshop

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TELEGRAFT -- The International Society for Cellular Therapy newsletter cited MARK ROBERTS's "particularly interesting" demonstration of emergent disease modeling using Pitt Public Health's FRED (Framework for Reconstructing Epidemiological Dynamics) at the FDA workshop on "Identification and Characterization of the Infectious Disease Risks of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-based Products." 

HuGen's Finegold discusses rare diseases with ABC News

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ABC NEWS - Pitt Public Health's DAVID FINEGOLD discusses both the research and cost challenges s associated with so-called "rare diseases" with ABC News' chief health/medical editor, Dr. Richard Besservia his TwitterChat @abcDrBchat. Click for a Storify summary of this national #RareDiseaseDay event. 

EPI researchers find ‘Equol’ may determine if soy protects your heart

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PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE - Epidemiology faculty AKIRA SEKIKAWA (senior author) and RHOBERT EVANS, with then-students VASUDHA AHUJA (EPI '15) and ABHISHEK VISHNU (EPI '14) clarify in the British Journal of Nutrition why eating soy foods provides a protective benefit only to some people. Japanese men who are able to produce equol—a substance made when certain “good” gut bacteria metabolize isoflavones in soy—have lower levels of a risk factor for... 

EPI's Kriska receives Provost Award for Excellence in Mentoring

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EPI's ANDREA KRISKA has been honored with a 2017 Provost's Award for Excellence in Mentoring. As a committed and effective advisor, she has served as the primary advisor and committee chair for 14 doctoral students, 22 master’s students, and 11 post-doctoral trainees. 

EPI alumnus Christopher Taylor selected as a finalist in Cathedral Innovation Challenge

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Warhol-inspired "Cathedral Cookies" created by CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR (EPI '10) were selected for the finals of the Cathedral Innovation Challenge, which dares community members to create artistic replicas of Pitt's iconic tower. Inspired by Pittsburgh artist Andy Warhol, Taylor's set of four depictions are created on  3 x 5-1/2-inch vanilla shortbread cookies using royal icing and food-color paint, making the piece entirely edible. 

Biostats student Lauren Balmert to present findings in Harrisburg

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Doctoral student LAUREN BALMERT (BIOST '17) has been selected to present her research on accidental poisoning mortality to our elected leaders and alumni at Pitt Day in Harrisburg on March 21, 2017.  

Jarlenski study raises questions about why young mothers are being prescribed opioids

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FORBES - Young mothers are being prescribed opioid painkillers, placing their children—even those less than a year old—at risk for an overdose. A study in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology  co-authored by HPM's MARIAN JARLENSKI found that 12% of women filled a prescription for an opioid within five days of their baby’s birth....[Of them] 14% filled a second opioid prescription 6 to 60 days after delivery.    

BCHS leader appointed Philip B. Hallen Endowed Chair in Community Health and Social Justice.

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Professor Steven Albert, Chair of the Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, is the newly appointed Philip B. Hallen Endowed Chair in Community Health and Social Justice, recognizing the exceptional quality and importance of his career-long commitment to conducting research intended to improve the health and functioning of vulnerable populations, his teaching, service and leadership, and his dedication to health equity. 

CDC appoints BCHS's Bear to national oversight group on behavioral risk factor surveillance

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Assistant professor TODD BEAR has been appointed to the CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) national workgroup which provides oversight for the BRFSS through annual reviews and recommendations concerning the content of the survey, sample design modifications, and protocol adjustments. Congratulations, Todd! 

Pitt Public Health teams up with Pitt Business for MHA/MBA joint degree

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POETS & QUANTS - In an uncertain healthcare landscape, the two schools are teaming up to address an overwhelming national need for quality health care managers.  “The synthesis between the two areas is pretty important, because of the increased competitiveness in health care and the uncertainty of federal funding programs,” says WES ROHRER, director of the MHA program. Says department chair Mark Roberts, “From the business school, it’s hard to i... 

HuGen's Nimgaonkar sheds light on shared roots of schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis

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NEWS-MEDICAL - According to an in-depth computational analysis published in the JOURNAL OF SCHIZOPHRENIA and co-authored by VISHWAJIT NIMGAONKAR, professor of psychiatry and human genetics, variants in eight genes implicated in both schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis may explain why susceptibility to one of the disorders could place individuals at lower risk for the other. "We wondered if individual genetic variants may exist that could have ... 

Limited access to room A115

During first-floor construction in March, access to room A115 will be via the Crabtree elevator or the stairwell from the parking garage (see "First floor Parran Hall construction"). Note there will be no handicapped emergency egress from A115 (i.e. during an emergency in which the elevator is shut down), so avoid scheduling events here during this time. For questions or scheduling, contact Joanne Pegher in Student Affairs.  

First floor Parran Hall construction

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The first floor hallway between Parran and Crabtree will be under construction during the month of March. During that time, access between Parran and Crabtree will be via the second floor. As a part of that work, the Crabtree first floor restrooms will be demolished. Vending machine will move to the second floor of Crabtree.  

General construction update

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The North Parran renovation project is on schedule, and should be completed in November 2017. Framing of office walls is well underway on the upper floors, and demolition is almost complete on the lower floors. Student work and collaboration spaces in North Parran are in the design phase.  Due to change in the construction scheduling, the coffee shop will not open until sometime this summer.   

EPI's King reports that standing is a good start for very obese people

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KNOWRIDGE - “Adults with severe obesity often have difficultly following national guidelines to participate in at least 30 minutes per day of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity for health benefits,” says lead author WENDY C. KING, associate professor of epidemiology.  

Fourth annual Alumni-Students Networking Breakfast

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On February 24, 2017, the Pitt Public Health Commons buzzed as 56 students practiced networking skills and 32 alumni shared career experiences, all to equip the next generation of public health professionals. 

EPI's Fabio finds TV habits may be sending you to the ER

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PASTE - “TV programs that show more high-risk behavior—whether it’s risk taking, violence, or using alcohol or drugs—seem to increase risk of injury in people predisposed to hostility,” according to a 15-year study of television viewing and hostile personality traits led by the EPI Data Center's ANTHONY FABIO. “We think it desensitizes folks to these behaviors, so the notion [of engaging in dangerous behaviors] becomes less high-risk.” 

HPM's Roberts encourages medical career choices that suit your personality

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U.S.NEWS - Speaking from experience, HPM Chair MARK ROBERTS says there are lots of things doctors can do beside taking care of patients. A nonclinical route as medical researcher allows those with a passion for innovation to have enormous influence on the future by discovering a drug or increasing understanding of a disease. 

AJPH focuses on academic public health and the firearm crisis

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AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH -  In its March 2017 edition, AJPH takes a closer look at academic public health and the firearm crisis. Click to view featured articles and plan to attend the Food for Thought screening and discussion of Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA   on Thursday, 2/23. 

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