IDM Events

IDM Departmental Calendar

Event Category
Fri 9/20/2019 8:30AM - 12:00PM
35th Anniversary of the Pitt Men's Study IDM Event
35th Anniversary of the Pitt Men's Study
Fri 9/20/2019 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Public Health Auditorium (G23)


Public Health Auditorium (G23)
IDM
Event
Tue 10/8/2019 9:00AM - 4:30PM
PrEP Summit: Engagement, Adherence, Retention MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center Conference
PrEP Summit: Engagement, Adherence, Retention
Tue 10/8/2019 9:00AM - 4:30PM
Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces


Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces
MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center
Conference
Tue 10/22/2019 5:00PM - 8:30PM
Erie Evening Update: Sexual Health and Stigma MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center Conference
Erie Evening Update: Sexual Health and Stigma
Tue 10/22/2019 5:00PM - 8:30PM
Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces

This evening dinner update, in collaboration with the Erie Department of Health and Erie HIV Task Force, will be held at the Bayfront Convention Center.  The presenters will discuss Sexual Health History Taking and Sexual Health and Stigma, followed by a panel of local providers.


Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces
MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center
Conference

Recent Events

IDM Master's Defense

Megan Beary - MPH PEL '18: Validation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for sensitive..

Friday 4/13 2:00PM - 3:30PM
2121C Public Health

Validation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for sensitive quantification of Francisella tularensis strains

Abstract: Tularemia, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a life-threatening human and animal disease.  F. tularensis has a wide geographical distribution, a variety of vectors and reservoirs, and a low infectious dose, causing it to be considered a potential biological weapon and public health threat. There is currently no FDA-approved vaccine for F. tularensis. A sensitive and specific quantification method is needed to accurately detect bacterial isolates.  A review of the literature has shown that real-time PCR is a more accurate quantification method than traditional quantification methods. In order to contribute to the development of a vaccine, we have evaluated four sets of primers for use in real-time PCR with F. tularensis, enhanced the genomic DNA extraction protocol to make it more efficient, and enhanced quantification done by the Nanodrop™ One Spectrophotometer.  The evaluation of primers and the method validation of genomic DNA extraction and quantification will allow us to develop PCR standards for four subspecies of F. tularensis initially, and eventually will allow us to quantify bacterium in infected animal tissues.  The public health significance of this work is to further vaccine development for an extremely infectious disease in humans and animals. 

Advisor: Dr. Douglas Reed

Last Updated On Wednesday, April 11, 2018 by Abby Kincaid
Created On Wednesday, April 11, 2018

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