IDM Events

IDM Departmental Calendar

Event Category
Fri 9/20/2019 8:30AM - 12:00PM
35th Anniversary of the Pitt Men's Study IDM Event
35th Anniversary of the Pitt Men's Study
Fri 9/20/2019 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Public Health Auditorium (G23)


Public Health Auditorium (G23)
IDM
Event
Tue 10/8/2019 9:00AM - 4:30PM
PrEP Summit: Engagement, Adherence, Retention MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center Conference
PrEP Summit: Engagement, Adherence, Retention
Tue 10/8/2019 9:00AM - 4:30PM
Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces


Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces
MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center
Conference
Tue 10/22/2019 5:00PM - 8:30PM
Erie Evening Update: Sexual Health and Stigma MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center Conference
Erie Evening Update: Sexual Health and Stigma
Tue 10/22/2019 5:00PM - 8:30PM
Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces

This evening dinner update, in collaboration with the Erie Department of Health and Erie HIV Task Force, will be held at the Bayfront Convention Center.  The presenters will discuss Sexual Health History Taking and Sexual Health and Stigma, followed by a panel of local providers.


Outside Conference and Meeting Spaces
MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center
Conference

Recent Events

IDM Master's Defense

Jen Burwinkel - MS '18: Using Tissue Culture to Model Early Events in Francisella tularensis...

Friday 4/6 10:00AM - 12:00PM
A425 Public Health

Using Tissue Culture to Model Early Events in Francisella tularensis Pathogenesis

Abstract: Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium that causes tularemia or rabbit fever. The infectious dose is as low as 10 CFU. While a lot of F. tularensis research focuses on macrophages, lung epithelium cells may be important too. There are far more epithelial cells on the surface of the lungs than macrophages. With such a low infectious dose, it is more likely for F. tularensis to infect an epithelial cell than macrophage. I found that F. tularensis has similar growth rates in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) as murine macrophages (J774) after initial infection. Also, I have demonstrated that F. tularensis can infect human primary bronchial epithelium (HBE) in a 3D culture system that mimics airway architecture in the lung. The data suggests that it takes F. tularensis longer to infect the HBE cells than the A549 or J774 cells. I have worked to develop a protocol for infecting HBE cells with F. tularensis. The pathogenesis in rabbit lung tissue was assessed too. Over the course of the first three days post-exposure there is an increasing amount of inflammation, hemorrhaging and apoptosis in the lower left lung of rabbits. When taken all together, this data suggests lung epithelial cells could have a role in F. tularensis early pathogenesis and dissemination. 

Advisor: Douglas Reed

 

Last Updated On Thursday, April 05, 2018 by Abby Kincaid
Created On Tuesday, April 03, 2018

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