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Thu 9/19/2019 11:00AM - 12:00PM
EOH Journal Club
Particle Depletion Does Not Remediate Acute Effects of Traffic-related Air Pollution and Allergen EOH Journal Club
Particle Depletion Does Not Remediate Acute Effects of Traffic-related Air Pollution and Allergen
Thu 9/19/2019 11:00AM - 12:00PM
4140 Public Health, Young Seminar Room

Presenter: Brandy Hill

Paper: Particle Depletion Does Not Remediate Acute Effects of Traffic-related Air Pollution and Allergen. A Randomized, Double-Blind Crossover Study

Authors: Denise J. Wooding, Min Hyung Ryu, Anke Huls, Andrew D. Lee, David T. S. Lin, Christopher F. Rider, Agnes C. Y. Yuen, and Chris Carlsten

Abstract:
Rationale: Diesel exhaust (DE), an established model of trafficrelated
air pollution, contributes significantly to the global burden of
asthma and may augment the effects of allergen inhalation. Newer
diesel particulate-filtering technologies may increaseNO2 emissions,
raising questions regarding their effectiveness in reducing harm from
associated engine output.

Objectives: To assess the effects of DE and allergen coexposure on
lung function, airway responsiveness, and circulating leukocytes, and
determine whether DE particle depletion remediates these effects.

Methods: In this randomized, double-blind crossover study, 14
allergen-sensitized participants (9 with airway hyperresponsiveness)
underwent inhaled allergen challenge after 2-hour exposures to DE,
particle-depleted DE (PDDE), or filtered air. The control condition
was inhaled saline after filtered air. Blood sampling and spirometry
were performed before and up to 48 hours after exposures. Airway
responsiveness was evaluated at 24 hours.

Measurements and Main Results: PDDE plus allergen
coexposure impaired lung function more than DE plus allergen,
particularly in those genetically at risk. DE plus allergen and PDDE
plus allergen each increased airway responsiveness in normally
responsive participants.DEplus allergen increased blood neutrophils
and was associated with persistent eosinophilia at 48 hours. DE and
PDDE each increased total peripheral leukocyte counts in a manner
affected by participant genotypes. Changes in peripheral leukocytes
correlated with lung function decline.

Conclusions: Coexposure to DE and allergen impaired lung
function, which was worse after particle depletion (which increased
NO2). Thus, particulates are not necessarily the sole or main
culprit responsible for all harmful effects of DE. Policies and
technologies aimed at protecting public health should be scrutinized
in that regard.
Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02017431).

Keywords: diesel exhaust; asthma; filter; genetic susceptibility


4140 Public Health, Young Seminar Room

Recent Events

EOH Journal Club

Sputum proteomics and airway cell transcripts of current and ex-smokers with severe asthma

Thursday 11/15 11:00AM - 12:00PM
4140 Public Health, Young Seminar Room
Presenter: Shuangjia (Nicole) Xue

Paper: Sputum proteomics and airway cell transcripts of current and ex-smokers with severe asthma in U-BIOPRED: an exploratory analysis

Authors: Kentaro Takahashi, Stelios Pavlidis, Francois Ng Kee Kwong, Uruj Hoda,Christos Rossios, Kai Sun, Matthew Loza, Fred Baribaud, Pascal Chanez, Steve J. Fowler, Ildiko Horvath, Paolo Montuschi, Florian Singer, Jacek Musial, Barbro Dahlen, Sven-Eric Dahlen, Norbert Krug, Thomas Sandstrom, Dominic E. Shaw, Rene Lutter, Per Bakke,Louise J. Fleming, Peter H. Howarth, Massimo Caruso, Ana R. Sousa, Julie Corfield,Charles Auffray, Bertrand DeMeulder,Diane Lefaudeux, Ratko Djukanovic, Peter J. Sterk, Yike Guo ,Ian M. Adcock and Kian Fan Chung

Abstract: Severe asthma patients with a significant smoking history have airflow obstruction with reported neutrophilia. We hypothesise that multi-omic analysis will enable the definition of smoking and ex-smoking severe asthma molecular phenotypes. The U-BIOPRED cohort of severe asthma patients, containing current-smokers (CSA), ex-smokers (ESA), nonsmokers and healthy nonsmokers was examined. Blood and sputum cell counts, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and spirometry were obtained. Exploratory proteomic analysis of sputum supernatants and transcriptomic analysis of bronchial brushings, biopsies and sputum cells was performed. Colony-stimulating factor (CSF)2 protein levels were increased in CSA sputum supernatants, with azurocidin 1, neutrophil elastase and CXCL8 upregulated in ESA. Phagocytosis and innate immune pathways were associated with neutrophilic inflammation in ESA. Gene set variation analysis of bronchial epithelial cell transcriptome from CSA showed enrichment of xenobiotic metabolism, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress compared to other groups. CXCL5 and matrix metallopeptidase 12 genes were upregulated in ESA and the epithelial protective genes, mucin 2 and cystatin SN, were downregulated. Despite little difference in clinical characteristics, CSA were distinguishable from ESA subjects at the sputum proteomic level, with CSA patients having increased CSF2 expression and ESA patients showing sustained loss of epithelial barrier processes.

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Last Updated On Monday, October 22, 2018 by Orbell, Adam W
Created On Monday, October 15, 2018

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